World legal traditions and institutions
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World legal traditions and institutions

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Published by Pilgrimage in Jonesboro, Tenn .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Civil law.,
  • Common law.,
  • Law and socialism.,
  • Islamic law.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJames S.E. Opolot.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsK583 .O66 1981
The Physical Object
Paginationv, 171 p. ;
Number of Pages171
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3794856M
ISBN 100932930468
LC Control Number81084371
OCLC/WorldCa8224109

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Each tradition is examined in terms of its institutions and substantive law, its founding concepts and methods, its attitude towards the concept of change and its teaching on relations with other traditions and peoples. Legal traditions are explained in terms of multivalent and non-conflictual forms of logic and thought. This book will be invaluable to law students and lawyers engaged in comparative or /5(4). Legal Traditions of the World places national laws in the broader context of major legal traditions, those of chthonic (or indigenous) law, talmudic law, civil law, Islamic law, common law, Hindu law and Confucian law. Each tradition is examined in terms of its institutions and substantive law, its founding concepts and methods, its attitude towards the concept of change and its teaching on relations with other traditions Cited by: Legal Traditions of the World places national laws in the broader context of major legal traditions, those of chthonic (or indigenous) law, talmudic law, civil law, Islamic law, common law, Hindu law and Confucian law. Each tradition is examined in terms of its institutions. Legal traditions are explained in terms of multivalent and non-conflictual forms of logic and thought. This book will be invaluable to law students and lawyers engaged in comparative or transnational work, historians, social scientists, and all those interested in the legal traditions that underpin the world's 5/5(3).

  The first edition of Legal Traditions of the World (Oxford University Press, ) received the Grand Prize of the International Academy of Comparative Law. He is a former Director of the Institute of Comparative Law, McGill University, and in that capacity worked on projects on the reform of the Russian Civil Code and judicial education in China/5(5). Legal Traditions of the World places national laws in the broader context of major legal traditions, those of chthonic (or indigenous) law, talmudic law, civil law, Islamic law, common law, Hindu law and Confucian law. The central topics discussed in this book include: the nature and scope of comparative legal inquiries; the relationship of comparative law to other fields of legal study; the aims and uses of comparative law; the origins and historical development of comparative law; and the evolution and defining features of some of the world’s predominant legal : Springer International Publishing. Like the first edition, it contains ten chapters: three “theoretical” chapters discuss Glenn’s concept of tradition and seven “substantive” chapters describe the chthonic, Talmudic, civil law, Islamic, common law, Hindu, and Asian legal traditions.

  Legal Traditions of the World by H. Patrick Glenn, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(40). ost nations today follow one of two major le - gal traditions: common law or civil law. The common law tradition emerged in England during the Middle Ages and File Size: 1MB. The Changing Presence of the Past 1 2 Between Traditions: Identity, Persuasion and Survival 31 3 A Chthonic Legal Tradition: to Recycle the World 58 4 A Talmudic Legal Tradition: the Perfect Author 93 5 A Civil Law Tradition: the Centrality of the Person 6 An Islamic Legal Tradition: the Law of a Later Revelation 7 A Common Law. Formal institutions are explicitly set forth by a relevant authority and informal institutions are generally unwritten societal rules, norms, and traditions. [5] Primary or meta-institutions are institutions that encompass many other institutions, both formal and informal (e.g. the family, government, the economy, education, and religion.